DAYS

36

HRS

152

MINS

30

SECS

56

PROCESSING

MECHANIZATION

OUR MISSION

The Global African Agribusiness Accelerator Platform seeks to identify and work with Africa-active agribusiness/ agriculture enterprise owners aged 40 or below who have been in business at least 2-3 years or more, and who seek to grow their enterprises by 20% year on year over the next three years.

The objective of the platform is also to:

  • promote intra-African, intra-youth, knowledge and success model sharing,
  • promote trade and investment in agriculture and agribusiness among platform members,
  • promote youth in agriculture and agribusiness by showcasing and promoting platform members,
  • create mutually beneficial linkages between youth owned enterprises and the growing number of smallholder farmer transformation “projects” on the continent; and
  • accelerate the economic impact of agriculture and agribusiness enterprise owners who are GAAAP members – in the communities where they are active.
GAAAP Concept Note (English)
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GAAAP MODULES:

There are six key components to GAAAP:

Technology and Mechanization Workshop
a two-day technology and mechanization adoption platform meeting (December 2016)
Finance and Resource Mobilization Workshop
a two-day finance and resource mobilization platform meeting (April/ May 2017)
Partnership and Trade Mobilization Workshop
a two-day partnership and trade development meeting (August/ September 2017)
Centers of Excellence - Learning Journey Tours
Periodically, we will coordinate “learning journeys” to take GAAAP members to selected cities/ places globally where there are technologies, processes, innovations that can be catalytic if implemented in Africa;
Knowledge Portal
GAAAP will establish a web platform through which GAAAP members will have a robust e-knowledge sharing and dissemination vehicle.  This “portal” will build on the work we did in developing the UNDP African Women and Youth Finance Portal (see http://www.africa-platform.org/WomenandYouthFinance) and in authoring the 2012 UNDP Inclusive Business Finance Handbook.
Volunteer Mentorship Corps
GAAAP will seek to identify retired professionals who are willing to mentor GAAAP community / attendees.

ABOUT GAAAP

As an African economic development company with a focus on promoting private sector development and encouraging greater private sector engagement in support of the realization of the continental African development agenda as outlined by the African Union and its implementation arm, the NEPAD Agency, Africa Business Group is seeking to utilize its relationship with various Africa active business owners below and/ or near the age of 40 who are building enterprises involved in agriculture and agribusiness to forge a platform of practitioners - and to help them accelerate their growth and ability to be economically impactful in their chosen fields of endeavor. Additionally, ABG seeks to use its relationships with African government, AU organs, development partners and development agencies to accelerate the development of mutually beneficial linkages between the emerging fast growing agri-sector companies and small holders and other stakeholders in Africa’s food value chains.

OBJECTIVE

The Global African Agribusiness Accelerator Platform seeks to identify and work with Africa-active agribusiness/ agriculture enterprise owners aged 40 or below who have been in business 3 years or more, and seek to grow their enterprises by 20% year on year over the next three years.

The objective of the platform is also to: a) promote intra-African, intra-youth, knowledge and success model sharing, b) promote trade and investment in agriculture and agribusiness among platform members, c) promote youth in agriculture and agribusiness by showcasing and promoting platform members, d) create mutually beneficial linkages between youth owned enterprises and the growing number of smallholder farmer transformation “projects” on the continent; and e) accelerate the economic impact of agriculture and agribusiness enterprise owners who are GAAAP members – in the communities where they are active.

Lastly, in 2016 the desire is to identify and bring together 100 such enterprise owners, in 2017 to bring together 300 such enterprise owners, and in 2018 to bring together 500 such enterprise owners. By 2020, we would like the community to include at least 2000 young agriculture/ enterprise owners.

GAAAP MODULES:

There are six key components to GAAAP:

Technology and Mechanization Workshop
a two-day technology and mechanization adoption platform meeting (December 2016)
Finance and Resource Mobilization Workshop
a two-day finance and resource mobilization platform meeting (April/ May 2017)
Partnership and Trade Mobilization Workshop
a two-day partnership and trade development meeting (August/ September 2017)
Centers of Excellence - Learning Journey Tours
Periodically, we will coordinate “learning journeys” to take GAAAP members to selected cities/ places globally where there are technologies, processes, innovations that can be catalytic if implemented in Africa;
Knowledge Portal
GAAAP will establish a web platform through which GAAAP members will have a robust e-knowledge sharing and dissemination vehicle.  This “portal” will build on the work we did in developing the UNDP African Women and Youth Finance Portal (see http://www.africa-platform.org/WomenandYouthFinance) and in authoring the 2012 UNDP Inclusive Business Finance Handbook.
Volunteer Mentorship Corps
GAAAP will seek to identify retired professionals who are willing to mentor GAAAP community / attendees.

CORE PRINCIPLES

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Principles of GAAAP:

  • Delegates Contribute: $200 per session per Trimester/ Workshop: Rationale: Firstly, participation in GAAAP is an investment in the development of one’s business, and those things we pay for we tend to appreciate more – and seek to get more out of. Secondly, the sustainability of a platform such as GAAAP requires delegate/ member contribution; and Thirdly, with delegates/ members investing in their own capacity development, it will be easier to mobilize matching support – while maintaining the initiative as an “African led” one.
  • Delegates have Been in Business at Least Three Years: GAAAP is an accelerator, rather than an incubator. Optimally, the companies attracted to GAAAP have proven their models – but now want to take their business to scale and pursue meaningful growth of the next three years (and beyond). Typically, also banks and investors are keen to review at least three-years of company financials when evaluating an investment and/or a loan to a business – so all of the GAAAP members, theoretically, would meet this threshold;
  • Delegates are Youthful: GAAAP seeks to work with business owners who are above 21 and at or around 40 years of age. The rationale is that these are catalytic business people for the growth of the agri-industry in the 21st century in Africa – and the relationships made, resources mobilized, and technologies adopted through GAAAP will help undergird the growth of their businesses for minimally the next 20 – 25 years;
  • Delegates are Representative of the Five Regions of the Continent – and the Diaspora: GAAAP seeks to facilitate the development of continental professional and business networks among its members, and to foster linkages between young Diasporans and their peers on the continent. Thus efforts will be made to identify and invite representatives to participate from the Five AU regions *East, Central, West, North, and Southern Africa) as well as from Europe, North America and the Caribbean, and South America. Non-African delegates active in, and committed to the development of Africa’s food industry (across the value chain) will of course also be welcome;
  • Goal Setting and Business Planning are Critical to Success: As a participant in GAAAP, there is an expectation that the business owner seeks to grow his or her business by 20% each year for at least the next three years. At the beginning of a GAAAP 12 months Cycle, delegates will be asked to write down their goals for the next 12 months, and how they want to utilize their participation in GAAAP to achieve those goals. They will also be asked to put down on paper their 3 year goal. At the beginning of each Session, delegates will also be asked to write down their aims for the specific session and what they want to get out of participation in the session. At the end of the Session, they will review these goals and discuss their assessment of whether on a scale of 1 – 10 they achieved that aim, and if not, why not. This feedback will help us continue to improve GAAAP and also provide a real-time reflection on the experience by participants. Lastly, each GAAAP delegate will be asked to develop a six month Action Plan on how they will leverage the contacts, knowledge and experience of the Session – to guide meaningful follow-up after the Session.

CORE PRINCIPLES

THEORY OF CHANGE

ABOUT THE ORGANIZER

Established in 2005, Africa Business Group (ABG) is an African economic development company with three key areas of focus:

  • Economic and Business Development Consulting;
  • Project Development and Implementation in a number of key sectors to the African economy (including tourism, agribusiness/ agriculture, renewable energy, and manufacturing); and
  • the provision of Capacity Development services and assistance.

As “private sector development” specialists, a particular focus of ABG involves facilitating increased private sector involvement in the implementation of the continent’s economic development through the fostering of greater public-private collaboration and partnership.

Through the provision of superior service, ABG’s Corporate Mission is to:

  • Develop and implement African and internationally funded initiatives that foster public and private sector collaboration to accelerate economic development in Africa;
  • Help African governments, agencies, and regional and continent-wide institutions to develop and implement policies, strategies and programs to increase trade and investment in Africa, and between Africa and the rest of the world;
  • Help Africa-based businesses to expand across Africa, and internationally; and
  • Help overseas businesses to successfully trade and invest in Africa.

From its principal offices in Johannesburg, South Africa and with the assistance of a continentally and internationally based cadre of consulting associates, the Africa Business Group is a growing company that specializes in the design, promotion, facilitation and implementation of African economic development projects – with a particular focus on supporting private sector engagement and development within continental development initiatives.

Selected past and current clients of ABG include:

  • AGCO
  • Grow Africa
  • Alliance for Green Revolution in Africa
  • African Fertilizer and Agribusiness Partnership
  • UNDP African Facility for Inclusive Markets
  • NEPAD Agency
  • African Union, Economic Affairs Department
  • Rockefeller Foundation
  • African Development Bank
  • International Finance Corporation
  • UNDP - Swaziland, Malawi, Nigeria
  • Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development of Rep. of Rural
  • UN Economic Commission for Africa
  • European Commission
  • Tshwane University of Technology Centre for Energy and Electricity Power
  • African Rural and Agriculture Credit Association
  • African Union, Department of Rural Economy and Agriculture
  • USAID
  • GIZ
  • Welsh Assembly Government, UK
  • South African Treasury
  • South Africa Broadcasting Corporation
  • Sesame Workshop
  • Discovery Channel
  • Technium Wales
  • Gauteng Department of Economic Development
  • City of Johannesburg Department of Economic Development
  • South Africa National Development Agency
  • Independent Communications Authority of South Africa
  • African Forum For Utility Regulators
  • African Forum for Agricultural Advisory Services
  • Development Alternatives International
  • AGCO
  • Grow Africa
  • Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa
  • African Fertilizer and Agribusiness Partnership
  • UNDP African Facility for inclusive Markets
  • NEPAD Agency
  • African Union, Economic Affairs Department
  • Rockafeller Foundation
  • African Development Bank
  • International Finance Corporation
  • UNDP - Swaziland, Malawi, Nigeria
  • Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural

ABOUT GAAAP

As an African economic development company with a focus on promoting private sector development and encouraging greater private sector engagement in support of the realization of the continental African development agenda as outlined by the African Union and its implementation arm, the NEPAD Agency, Africa Business Group is seeking to utilize its relationship with various Africa active business owners below and/ or near the age of 40 who are building enterprises involved in agriculture and agribusiness to forge a platform of practitioners - and to help them accelerate their growth and ability to be economically impactful in their chosen fields of endeavor. Additionally, ABG seeks to use its relationships with African government, AU organs, development partners and development agencies to accelerate the development of mutually beneficial linkages between the emerging fast growing agri-sector companies and small holders and other stakeholders in Africa’s food value chains.

OBJECTIVE

The Global African Agribusiness Accelerator Platform seeks to identify and work with Africa-active agribusiness/ agriculture enterprise owners aged 40 or below who have been in business 3 years or more, and seek to grow their enterprises by 20% year on year over the next three years.

The objective of the platform is also to: a) promote intra-African, intra-youth, knowledge and success model sharing, b) promote trade and investment in agriculture and agribusiness among platform members, c) promote youth in agriculture and agribusiness by showcasing and promoting platform members, d) create mutually beneficial linkages between youth owned enterprises and the growing number of smallholder farmer transformation “projects” on the continent; and e) accelerate the economic impact of agriculture and agribusiness enterprise owners who are GAAAP members – in the communities where they are active.

Lastly, in 2016 the desire is to identify and bring together 100 such enterprise owners, in 2017 to bring together 300 such enterprise owners, and in 2018 to bring together 500 such enterprise owners. By 2020, we would like the community to include at least 2000 young agriculture/ enterprise owners.

GAAAP MODULES:

There are six key components to GAAAP:

Technology and Mechanization Workshop
a two-day technology and mechanization adoption platform meeting (December 2016)
Finance and Resource Mobilization Workshop
a two-day finance and resource mobilization platform meeting (April/ May 2017)
Partnership and Trade Mobilization Workshop
a two-day partnership and trade development meeting (August/ September 2017)
Centers of Excellence - Learning Journey Tours
Periodically, we will coordinate “learning journeys” to take GAAAP members to selected cities/ places globally where there are technologies, processes, innovations that can be catalytic if implemented in Africa;
Knowledge Portal
GAAAP will establish a web platform through which GAAAP members will have a robust e-knowledge sharing and dissemination vehicle.  This “portal” will build on the work we did in developing the UNDP African Women and Youth Finance Portal (see http://www.africa-platform.org/WomenandYouthFinance) and in authoring the 2012 UNDP Inclusive Business Finance Handbook.
Volunteer Mentorship Corps
GAAAP will seek to identify retired professionals who are willing to mentor GAAAP community / attendees.

CORE PRINCIPLE

There are six key components to GAAAP:

  • Delegates Contribute: $200 per session per Trimester/ Workshop: Rationale: Firstly, participation in GAAAP is an investment in the development of one’s business, and those things we pay for we tend to appreciate more – and seek to get more out of. Secondly, the sustainability of a platform such as GAAAP requires delegate/ member contribution; and Thirdly, with delegates/ members investing in their own capacity development, it will be easier to mobilize matching support – while maintaining the initiative as an “African led” one.
  • Delegates have Been in Business at Least Three Years:  GAAAP is an accelerator, rather than an incubator.  Optimally, the companies attracted to GAAAP have proven their models – but now want to take their business to scale and pursue meaningful growth of the next three years (and beyond).  Typically, also banks and investors are keen to review at least three-years of company financials when evaluating an investment and/or a loan to a business – so all of the GAAAP members, theoretically, would meet this threshold;
  • Delegates are Youthful: GAAAP seeks to work with business owners who are above 21 and at or around 40 years of age.  The rationale is that these are catalytic business people for the growth of the agri-industry in the 21st century in Africa – and the relationships made, resources mobilized, and technologies adopted through GAAAP will help undergird the growth of their businesses for minimally the next 20 – 25 years;
  • Delegates are Representative of the Five Regions of the Continent – and the Diaspora:  GAAAP seeks to facilitate the development of continental professional and business networks among its members, and to foster linkages between young Diasporans and their peers on the continent.  Thus efforts will be made to identify and invite representatives to participate from the Five AU regions *East, Central, West, North, and Southern Africa) as well as from Europe, North America and the Caribbean, and South America. Non-African delegates active in, and committed to the development of Africa’s food industry (across the value chain) will of course also be welcome;
  • Goal Setting and Business Planning are Critical to Success:  As a participant in GAAAP, there is an expectation that the business owner seeks to grow his or her business by 20% each year for at least the next three years.  At the beginning of a GAAAP 12 months Cycle, delegates will be asked to write down their goals for the next 12 months, and how they want to utilize their participation in GAAAP to achieve those goals.  They will also be asked to put down on paper their 3 year goal.  At the beginning of each Session, delegates will also be asked to write down their aims for the specific session and what they want to get out of participation in the session.  At the end of the Session, they will review these goals and discuss their assessment of whether on a scale of 1 – 10 they achieved that aim, and if not, why not.  This feedback will help us continue to improve GAAAP and also provide a real-time reflection on the experience by participants.  Lastly, each GAAAP delegate will be asked to develop a six month Action Plan on how they will leverage the contacts, knowledge and experience of the Session – to guide meaningful follow-up after the Session.
BACK TO THE SITE